In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

 In  Sublime , Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places.  Sublime  proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.  The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in  Sublime  approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.  Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.  Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the  Sublime  photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.

In Sublime, Adam contemplates the grandeur of the sky, ocean, and forest of his homeland in Newfoundland. As a city dweller, Adam’s experience of this expansive place is at once foreign and familiar, both about returning home and experiencing unexplored places. Sublime proved to be transformational in Adam’s work. This inaugural exploration of Newfoundland prompted further investigation of its history, leading to several bodies of work photographing resettled communities.

The large scale and the focus on natural settings in these images recall 19th century Hudson River School landscape paintings. While those paintings romanticized the natural world and emphasized its formidable power over humankind, the photographs in Sublime approach nature on a less intimidating—though still majestic—scale.

Newfoundland’s trademark fog is the protagonist of these photographs. Though often associated with melancholy, here the atmosphere is almost playful: clouds echo the shapes of rock formations, fog obscures the horizon line, and the only evidence of the elusive wind is the way the trees lean in its wake. The photographs are alive with texture: snow-laden branches, grassy hills, faceted cliffs, the rippled surface of the sea. Others are more nuanced, requiring a longer look, to see what lies beyond the fog.

Adam inserts the human figure into some photographs in the series to investigate humankind’s relationship to the land. While figures in Hudson River School painting were minuscule compared to the imposing landscape, the figures in the Sublime photographs—seen from behind—fit into the landscape almost seamlessly. Even their clothing seems felicitous: the pattern of the woman’s sweater nearly aligns with the horizon; the man, with his camouflage hat, shares the palette of his surroundings.